Further Information

Our goal for this test was to see if it was possible for the ART system to effectively compensate for trajectory even if we did not zero the scope at 200 yards.
The Frame Aim Shoot Technique maximizes the capabilities of the Leatherwood ART scopes, allowing you to compensate for bullet drop without needing to know the distance to the target, dial any clicks or use holdovers.

Jim Leatherwood developed the ART scopes during the 60's to solve the important problem of range estimation. In Automatic Mode, the ART scopes can range targets of known dimension and compensate for the bullet's trajectory in one action. But, what if you wanted to increase the magnification more than what was given by Automatic mode?

Follow along for a framing demonstration with the M1000-PRO from 200 to 600 yards at Angeles Shooting Range.
Let’s walk through the three easy steps it takes to get your M1000 zeroed and calibrated to your caliber and load. The patented technology of the M1000 PRO raises and lowers the rear of the scope, allowing you to get first-round hits of up to 1000 yards without dialing for elevation or complex distance estimation.

In this lesson we’re going to take a look at how to use our ballistic calculator or dope data from our rifle log to zero our ART scope at a closer distance. In order to obtain an equivalent 200 yard zero for the M1000 at 25 yards, we’ll first need to understand the relationship between the optic’s line of sight, the rifle’s line of bore, and the bullet’s path.

Today we’re going to take a look at how to use a ballistics calculator to determine your initial cam setting for the M1000 PRO and the M1200 XLR ART scopes. We’re using JBM ballistics - a free ballistic calculator online.

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