Further Information

To commemorate the launch of the new Leatherwood M1000-PRO rifle scope, we decided to test the Practical Accuracy of the M1000-PRO out to my rifle and ammo's maximum effective range. 

Patterned after the early Unertl Target Competition long tube scopes of the 1940s, which were employed by the Marines from WWII through Korea and Vietnam, the Leatherwood Wm. Malcolm USMC 8x Sniper Scope reproduction is every bit as stunning and useful as the old Unertls, only it is built with modern tolerances, really good glass and is something a person can afford, with an MSRP of $549. By comparison, a genuine Unertl—if you can find one—will set you back a grand or more. And most originals are in tough shape...

Check out the full article on GunDigest!

GOLD RUSH cast member Jack Hoffman stops by the Leatherwood/Hi-Lux Optics booth to take a look at a Model 1903 A3 that has been set up for Vintage Sniper Rifle competition - and to talk about the need for stringent wolf control. He loved the Hi-Lux Optics addition of the 8x USMC Sniper model to the Wm. Malcolm line of vintage riflescopes. When he picked up the rifle, his comment was... "Now here's a real rifle!"
I received my USMC Sniper scope yesterday and had to write. You’ve done an excellent job on this scope. I have a Unertl 8X Target & Varmint scope and I’ll confirm that your scope is noticeably brighter. The fit and finish is very close to the Unertl.
Jim shares, "The older I get...the more I like scopes...but didn't think a modern scope would be appropriate." He bought the Wm. Malcolm 3x short rifle telescope from MidwayUSA, and took his buffalo at just 50 yards.
A couple of months back, I received my Malcolm 8x USMC Sniper model scope before I had a rifle to put it on. Fortunately, I have a father-in-law with close to 500 guns...many of them with the blocks for this style scope already mounted on them. Among that wealth of firearms are seven Winchester Model 52 .22 caliber target rifles.
What really sets the newer versions of the ART system apart from the military ART models of the 1960's is the cam system which automatically allows for the trajectory of the round being shot.  Let's face it, the original ART scopes were set up to allow tactical shooters to keep hits on a man-sized target out to around 600 yards ... shooting rifles chambered for the U.S. military rifle cartridges of the time - the 5.56x45mm NATO (.223 Remington) and the 7.62x51mm NATO (.308 Winchester).
The 3-9x40mm hunting scopes have traditionally been the best selling scopes on the market. The Hi-Lux Optics "Buck Country" scope in that magnification range is one of the best moderately priced scopes available today. This scope is built with features, such as fully multi-coated lenses...and Tri-Center coil spring tension on the internal erector, which make it comparable to scopes costing $300...$400...or more.
The 1-4X optic power range has become a very hot area as 3 Gun shooters start to move around while shooting or shoot standing unsupported. Big magnification will just lead to frustration and slow shots. This low power optic concept is based on the military Designated Marksman optic requirements were moving and shooting is the norm at distances from 0-600 yards...
The CMR-AK762’s zeroing procedure is a bit different than the standard CMR’s because of the ballistic difference. The center 1 MOA dot inside of the double-horseshoes needs to be zero at 200 meters or yards for the rest of the BDCs to work. If a 200m range is not available, use the small “V” on top the smaller horseshoe for a 100m zero
... That next year, I drew an antelope tag and was lucky enough to find a Boone & Crockett buck...but he was 501 yard away.  I had the confidence in the gun and your scope, so I dropped the big boy! Next was my wife's hunt where she took a Coues-Whitetail buck at 584 yards...with 7 of family and friends watching...she dropped the buck!   Everybody couldn't believe it!   That's the day the rifle got its neck name "Freak Nasty"! That year I also took a 3x3 desert mule deer buck at 375 yards...

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