Free Shipping on Orders over $100

0

Your Cart is Empty

August 01, 2017

Perhaps the best way to describe the new TAC-V scope models from Hi-Lux Optics is to say that they are serious tactical scopes with serious long range capability.  The tactical reticle provides a lot of information for determining range, allowing for long range hold over, and even provides precise aiming points that allow for windage once the wind speed has been properly calculated. Whether these scopes are used for actual tactical use...or by today's"tactical hunter" looking to place a precise hit on varmints or big game at 400...500...600 or more yards, the TAC-V models can take a lot of guess work out of the equation.

Either the 2-10x42mm or the 4-20x50mm TAC-V models can be right at home on any long range hunting rifle - depending on the hunter's magnification needs.  I recently put one of the 2-10x models on a favorite center-fire big game rifle, a stainless Model 70 Winchester chambered for the .300 Winchester Short Magnum cartridge - mainly to begin my testing of the scope, to check the preciseness of the click adjustments, to insure that the scope maintains zero, and to actually check out some of the BDC hold-overs for the caliber and loads I shoot.  I was extremely impressed by the performance of this "tactical" scope on a "hunting" rifle. While I do enjoy shooting a lot at long range, mostly to check out the accuracy of a load out beyond normal shooting distances, about the only "tactical shooting"

I really do these days is to take out an occasional troublesome coyote...or to put an end to an elk-killing wolf's rein of terror on our big game herds in Montana, where I live.  Still, I shoot and generally hunt with most every kind of rifle available.  I even own...shoot...and occasionally hunt with a rifle of AR styling.  My favorite of the two AR's I own is an AR-10 in .308 Winchester caliber.

Hi-Lux TAC-V 210X42


Most all of my early shooting with this rifle was done with one of the excellent Hi-Lux Optics 1-4x CMR scopes mounted on the AR, using a set of Hi-Lux riser blocks.  Raising the scope just a half inch accomplished two things.  First, it brought the rear ocular lens more squarely in line with my shooting eye, and just as importantly, the blocks raised the scope enough to give more room for reaching under and operating the charging bar.  At 100 yards, I had absolutely no problem punching sub 1-inch groups with that rig. Hopefully, without angering any die hard .223/5.56mm cartridge fans, I personally like something a little bigger...something with a little more "oomph" than the .223 rifles,  That likely stems from living in country where I stand a solid chance of running into wolves, a mountain lion, or a bear, both black bears and grizzlies, when I take my three dogs on their almost daily hikes into the mountains...or down through often very thick river-bottom cover.  For those times, I want the knockdown power of a .308 cartridge and a 150 or 168 grain .30 caliber bullet.

Shot group PentaLux

This rifle is so accurate, it actually will challenge most bolt-action rifles of the same caliber.  It is fully capable of keeping hits in "The Zone" out at 700 or 800 yards.  My 2-10x TAC-V now resides on that rifle - and has been a stellar performer. When I give this AR the same respect I give a tack driving precision long-range bolt-action center-fire rifle, it will reward me with groups like that shown here.  That respect includes shooting a precision crafted load...and as most of you already realize, two identical rifles just might shoot BEST with two entirely different loads.  My AR-10 tends to really like a handload concocted with a Hornady 155-grain A-MAX bullet, powered by 41.5 grains of Accurate Arms No. 2460 powder.  The load gets out of the 16-inch barrel at around 2,640 f.p.s. (with 2,393 f.p.e.). Holding "dead on" at 200 yards, the rifle...TAC-V scope...and load prints just 1 3/4 inches below point of aim - very much still in "The Zone".  Playing around with the hold overs built into the reticle, I've found that I can easily keep hits on the 8" bull of the targets I use (at left) out to 500 yards...which is likely the farthest I would shoot at game.  At that distance the retained energy of the load/bullet would be just over 1,000 f.p.e.  (Note: Out of  a bolt-action hunting rifle with a 24-inch barrel this same load would produce a muzzle velocity of around 2,750 f.p.s., with 2,603 f.p.e.  Maximum effective range for deer-sized game would be around 600 yards.)

Hi-Lux TAC-V 2-10 and 4-20  MOA-MiL Reticle

The illuminated reticle of the 2-10x and 4-20x TAC-V model scopes may have been developed for the ballistics of .223/.308 cartridges, but the shooter who is willing to spend some time checking out at what distance those hold-over marks are "on" can use this scope and reticle for just about any rifle chambered for just about any cartridge available today.  When shooting during full daylight, with the illumination turned off, the reticle is very visible.  In fact, at 100 yards the center-dot of the 2-10x model set at 10x just covers the "X" shown on the above target.  The outer edges of the "X-Ring" are still visible, allowing the dot to be centered on the center of the target - resulting in very precise shot placement.  

The group shown here goes less than 1/2-inch center-to-center. So,if you want a bit more magnification for your AR, whether it is chambered for .223 or .308 ammo, here is a bright, clear, precise and exceptionally well designed and built scope that brings the best of both tactical features and long-range precision to today's shooters.  While the 2-10x TAC-V model offers a significantly wider magnification range, the scope is just 1.8 inches longer and weighs just 1.1 ounce more than the extremely popular 1-4x CMR model scopes.  The new TAC-V models will be available later this summer.  The 2-10x42mm model tested here will retail for $462.  


Leave a comment

Subscribe